Human Rights in Bahrain

I recognise the serious concerns about the human rights situation in Bahrain, particularly on the position of opposition and civil liberties groups, the detention of political prisoners and allegations of torture.

The 2011 Bahrain Independent Commission of Inquiry (BICI) into human rights abuses made no fewer than 26 recommendations. On 9 May 2016, the King of Bahrain announced that these had been “fully implemented”. However, developments such as the suspension of the opposition group Al Wefaq and the detention of Nabeel Rajab, for example, reinforce the view that serious human rights concerns remain.

The Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) has designated Bahrain a human rights priority country and expressed concerns about the issues I just mentioned as well as about freedom of expression and assembly more widely. Human rights should be at the heart of our foreign policy and the Government must ensure that it continues to raise these issues at the highest levels in Bahrain.

I know concerns have been raised about the use of technical assistance provided to Bahraini institutions by the UK. I believe the Government must justify why it believes this has been a sensible use of money and publish all its evaluations of those projects. I believe the Government should also urge Bahrain to allow the UN Special Rapporteur on Torture immediate, unrestricted and continued access to the country.

Given that the UK has been working with Bahrain on implementing reforms, the Government should be prepared to recognise where these reforms still have further to go and to publicly push the Bahrainis to go further.

I can assure you that I will continue monitor the human rights situation in Bahrain closely. Thank you once again for contacting me on this issue.